Wednesday, 11 December 2019

This weekend’s featured video is In Whose Backyard?, a documentary about people dealing with environmental racism all over Nova Scotia. The documentary came out of Ingrid Waldron’s ENRICH project. It premiered in 2014, and that’s also when I wrote this article. Check it out.

Looks like there will be quite a bit of gold mining activity on the Eastern Shore in the years to come. They will bring jobs, but risks as well. Let’s do this right, says the Easter Shore Forest Watch Association, because if we don’t we may have to live with the consequences for a very long time.

Land protectors in Labrador continue their resistance against Muskrat Falls. Just because the national and Nova Scotia press stopped reporting doesn’t mean all is quiet. We talk with Ossie Michelin about the Nova Scotia connection. Ossie’s 96-year old aunt was just served with a court order for visiting a protest site.

A group of Haligonians headed out in the drizzle to Victoria Park last night to express their disapproval of the Kinder Morgan pipeline. In doing so they joined many others in similar events from coast to coast. Also very much on their mind were the water defenders of Standing Rock Sioux Reserve, where police violence seems to escalate by the day. Art Bouman reports.

Arguing in court that the Sipekne’katik Band is a conquered people and that therefore the duty to consult does not apply is exactly the wrong thing to do for the McNeil government, writes contributor Art Bouman. But he isn’t surprised, it’s all about money and fossil fuels.

Ken Summers takes the pulse of the Alton Gas project in light of the company’s recent announcement that it will not begin its brining operation this year. The company’s future here doesn’t look quite as bright as it did say three years ago. It’s what happens when you’re not welcome.